Article: Hope or Judgment in Ezekiel 25:12-17

Yay! My very first journal article is now out on the Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft (ZAW) website (Germany-based). A four-page preview is available on my academia.edu. If you do not have the subscription or institutional access to this journal, you are very welcome to message me for an e-offprint (lydia.lee.siqi@gmail.com).

Special thanks go to Dr. Carla Sulzbach. I have never met her in person, but through the introduction of a teacher, I am able to communicate with her via emails. She provided me unconditional help in proofreading this paper and offered me plenty of encouragement along the way. Very grateful for this true act of kindness! 😀

Fun fact #1: If you were at one of my OAN lectures, you will understand the surprise I have hidden at the end of this article (Hint: Quentin Tarantino, https://aroundtheworldinmorethaneightydays.wordpress.com/2014/12/28/i-love-teaching/)

Fun fact #2: Due to the word limit set by ZAW (38000 characters, including spaces), this is actually the shortest journal article I have written so far. The word limit does help me keep to the point, so I hope. 😉

Hope you enjoy reading this article!

Abstract:

Ezekiel 25:12-17 depicts one conflict zone peppered with violence and bloodshed, where Edom and Philistia took bitter vengeance against the house of Judah, and in turn incurred the divine retaliations. This essay argues that the oracles against Edom and Philistia in Ezekiel 25:12-17 contain highly significant semantic parallels with other biblical texts narrating the divine judgment executed against Jerusalem. Utilizing those semantic parallels in the literary context of Ezekiel 25:12-17, the oracles against Edom and Philistia create a radical rhetorical impact, such that the house of Judah, though victimized, is not compensated materially. Instead, the oracles peculiarly form an oblique rhetoric, affirming not only the dispossession of belligerent Edom and Philistia, but also that of Judah.

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The publisher generously sent every author one copy of the journal 🙂

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Look, my name is finally printed on an academic journal!

 

 

 

 

Announcement: Two Articles Passed the Double-Blind Peer-Reviews

A year after the defense of my dissertation.

5 months after the tutorial I led.

Another semester has just gone by.

A tiny update from me to you: Two of my articles have passed the double-blind peer-reviews (abstracts can be found in my academia.edu).

They are accepted by two good academic journals.

ZAWThe first one is called Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft (European Science Foundation Ranking A). Here is the link to the journal’s website:

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/zatw

So if any of you has some new ideas about the scholarly research of any parts of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, you can just write it down, and email the editors for a peer-review. Don’t worry, they accept articles written in not only German, but also English and French.

RdQ104The second one is called Revue de Qumran (European Science Foundation Ranking A). Here is the journal’s beautiful website:

http://revuedequmran.fr/

Again if any of you has some new ideas about the scholarly research of any parts of the Dead Sea Scrolls, just send your articles to the editors for a peer-review.  Articles in English, French, German, Italian and Spanish are welcome.

If the information provided by the editors is correct, my articles will be in print in December 2015. Of course, I will then make proper thanks to the kind and friendly people who have not given up on me and have helped in the improvements of my articles 😀