Announcement: 2016 End of Year Report

End of year report. Look forward to my next year in South Africa 😀

1. Received first prize for my presentation entitled “How do Biblical Scholars Conduct Their Research” at the Fourth Annual North-West University Postdoctoral Conference. The candlelit dinner organized by the international office brought the conference to a beautiful end.

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Photo Credit: NWU International Office

2. Received a full mark for my second semester of the Latin course. This final mark is derived from 16 class tests, 12 quizzes, 4 exams, 3 assignments, and 1 PPT presentation.

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3. Learned Afrikaans for fun. Ek hoop jy het ‘n heerlike Kersfees en ‘n voorspoedige nuwe jaar! Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! 😀

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UNA LINGUA NUMQUAM SATIS EST: Learning Latin at Potchefstroom

Here are the ancient languages I have learned so far (not counting the modern languages):

  1. Biblical Hebrew (8 semesters at the University of Sydney, with background knowledge of inscriptional Hebrew, Dead Sea Scrolls Hebrew, and Mishnaic Hebrew)
  2. Biblical Aramaic (6 semesters ar the University of Sydney, with background knowledge of inscriptional Aramaic)
  3. Akkadian (3 semesters at Georg-August-Universität Göttingen)
  4. New Testament Greek (2 semesters at the University of Sydney + vacation intensive course at Georg-August-Universität Göttingen)
  5. Classical Greek (1 semester, Graecum at Georg-August-Universität Göttingen)

Note: Certificates obtained from the above language courses can be sent to the relevant authority upon request.

Now I am picking up Latin at Potchefstroom! We are using Oxford Latin Course as our textbook. Further review exercises can be found on this really helpful website: http://www.umsl.edu/~phillipsm/oldrills/

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Photo courtesy of alibris

By the way, do you know that more than 50% of modern English words are built on Latin? The grammar structure of German and Greek bears great resemblances to that of Latin; French, Italian, Portugese, and Spanish find their roots in Latin. European languages can be so utterly connected! 😉

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Photo courtesy of Business Insider